EMERY: The integration of state, corporation, and technology is a grave threat to our freedoms – Western Standard

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Governments in Canada have every business in the country on intravenous tax and wage subsidies.
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It’s been 10 days of official Ontario Apartheid. Anywhere you can sit, I’m to be refused. And they do refuse me. They all comply. There are no holdouts in London, Ontario.
If you are not double-vaccinated, you are now getting used to being asked for your papers. Many asking don’t like doing it. Many say they feel weird doing it. But they all comply. All of them. Those that boast of non-compliance are ultimately those not required to ask. Not yet, at least. They will be mandated soon enough, and then we will see them all fall in line.  
Why will they comply? Because the government is the biggest buyer of advertisements on TV, radio, social media. The media is awash in Queens Park and Ottawa-funded public service announcements. Plus that $600 million media bailout subsidy provided by the federal Liberal government.  
Governments in Canada have every business in the country on intravenous tax and wage subsidies. Almost every business in Canada is receiving huge handouts to cope with the terrible economic reality that COIVD-19 over-reaction has manufactured. CERB and its successors is free money to stay at home.
The inflation all rational people could see coming as printed money entering circulation without a corresponding increase in production causes prices to rise. All that printed money that was created out of the thin air has been the way governments have operated for about 50 years now.
But now, years of zero interest have made governments and politicians ignore the moral hazard they are creating. Moral hazard is when government policy removes the consequences of one’s own actions by incentivizing bad behavior. Non-existent central bank interest rates for the corporate elite and 24% credit card interest for you and I, is a prime example. They are printing money and throwing it at every corporate interest, ethnic, gender, economic, cultural, and media entity they can find.
It all has to be paid back. Yet it can’t be paid back.
We won’t even be able to scale back the massive welfare program we have every person and business entity on without a significant rise in closings, bankruptcies, unemployment and, of course, inflation.
It’s a terrible situation for small business, perfect for many big business. Big business has the legal departments to maximize their subsidies; large elements of the corporate sector have soaked the Canadian taxpayer in times of record earnings for big tech, big food, big media, big retail, and big online. The little guy knows he loses his independence with these subsidies, but he also knows the economy is still crippled and he isn’t sure about survival without these now expected handouts.
So why do small, independent businesses comply? Because every other business will when told what to do. Those that won’t will get crushed by the hammer of the state. Just like many of the unvaccinated medical workers, doctors, nurses that are being fired by the thousands, they are going to retire or just stand back until the madness, the mass psychosis, plays itself out. The economics the accelerated integration of state-mandated public health with big government and big business interests have harmonious methods and goals.
It’s common in this era to look at the absurd inward obsessed vanities as distractions from the very real threats facing us. We look the other way while Australia becomes a violent police state as navel gaze about our preferred pronouns, or the transgressions of someone’s tweet ten years ago before they were sufficiently woke. Everyone has perfected the art of soul-satisfying ignorance of what is going on around us and prefers to ignore questions that hurt the brain.
Questions like, “are we going to come out the other side of this a free country?” There are no good signs ahead. All conclusions lead to increasingly authoritarian state-corporate-technology integration. Everything to do with anything is more inconvenient, more expensive, more awkward, more exclusionary, more authoritarian, less fun. And strangely, it all feels like everyone agrees, but no one asks where it will all end.
Marc Emery is a Columnist for the Western Standard
NAVARRO-GENIE: Trudeau’s small gestures speak louder than his great deeds
WAGNER: Bad Moon Rising, the imminent threat of another NDP government
Marc Emery is a Columnist for the Western Standard. He has a long history of libertarian activism and was Canada’s most prominent leader in the cannabis legalization movement, dubbed the “Prince of Pot”.
Quebec massively favoured in delivery of critical COVID supplies
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Left Coast
October 10, 2021 at 10:58 am
And how is this different from 1930s Berlin folks?
Canada is becoming a fascist state . . . over a CCP Virus that now Norway call just another Flu.
q
October 10, 2021 at 8:56 am
Thank you Western Standard for enlisting Marc Emery to your team! I have been a fan of his since he was the owner of City Lights bookstore and founded the Freedom Party. Marc you are a true blue defender of freedom and you walk the walk.
David
October 10, 2021 at 7:55 am
People need to ask themselves why any government would mandate a gene editing therapy they know is neither safe nor effective.
What do they get out of it?
Dominic Ieraci
October 9, 2021 at 3:00 pm
the sheep and cowards do what they are told no matter what. Only 3% of the settlers in the american colonies fought back against the british to gain their freedom. It’s going to be the fired Drs and nurses and all of us unvaxxed who will bring back our rights and freedoms, or die trying. Maybe we need to take over a geographical area and stick to ourselves, canada is lost.
Karen Selick
October 9, 2021 at 11:39 am
And Big Pharma is the biggest funder of politicians, at least in the US. We’re now finding out that there are many conflicts of interest in Canada, too. Ontario Premier Doug Ford’s campaign manager for the next election runs a lobbying firm whose clients include major pharmaceutical companies, especially the vaccine manufacturers.
Ariana McKone
October 9, 2021 at 11:32 am
Every person who shows their papers instead of saying I will go without permits the next, slightly more totalitarian measure to be put into place. Do you know what happens when millions of people refuse to comply with an unjust measure/law? nothing. Every dictator relies on the people whom they are abusing to follow their orders. and when they wont comply, the injustice disappears. It is that easy. If we can just decide to be people of principle who will forgo some personal comfort in the fight for a free and democratic country. This ends. It is more powerful for millions of individuals to take a personal stand then for a handful of businesses. They can punish a business for not following the orders but they can not punish you for not supporting a business who follows these unjust laws. please take a stand!
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Since the 2015 election campaign, Justin Trudeau said he placed his relationship with Indigenous Canadians above all others.
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The age-old expression that “actions speak louder than words” conveys an important insight: character is best judged through action. Anyone can say or promise anything but doing so requires ability and skill, discipline and commitment. So, the simplest test of character is to pay attention to deeds. 
Plutarch, the first century Greek biographer, refined the test. He advised that simple gestures, often private gestures, reveal far more about a leader’s character than his great speeches, political accomplishments or actions in battle. Plutarch’s insight speaks to the contrived nature of political activity. In public life, symbols and events are arranged for the sake of appearance. That is why unrehearsed, small gestures speak louder than great deeds, Plutarch would say.
The distinction mattered to the ancients. They believed the essence of a person matters more than her appearance. Grasping a person’s character despite crafted appearances was crucial, and it mattered most in political life. In public life, it meant developing the ability to evaluate character to determine the best possible person to govern.
All of which brings us to our prime minister. Since the 2015 election campaign, Justin Trudeau said he placed his relationship with Indigenous Canadians above all others. He promised to hear their voices. He promised them greater representation. He promised them clean drinking water. He promised them truth, and he promised them reconciliation.
Along with the promises, there has been no shortage of symbolic action. He says he is remorseful for the treatment of indigenous people in residential schools. He appointed the first indigenous governor general. He chose the first indigenous attorney general (and he fired the first indigenous attorney general). He declared a national holiday to honour Truth and Reconciliation. He visited and cried with former residential school students and their relatives. Many see these as big political accomplishments.
Conversely, some of his less grandiose actions point in a different direction.
On the first ever Truth and Reconciliation Day honouring indigenous victims of institutional abuse — a sombre occasion by any standard — Trudeau took off to the beach and ignored invitations to attend Indigenous ceremonies in Kamloops, BC.
Two things stand out from the beach vacation. First, the prime minister’s office launched a holiday with “truth” in the name with a lie: The PMO covered up the beach excursion, saying the PM was in Ottawa for “private meetings.” Hiding the beach vacation shows some awareness of the political sin.
Second, the holiday Trudeau created called on Canadians to reflect seriously on the relationship with their indigenous brothers and sisters. But outside Normandy, beaches hardly ever convey mourning or contrition. Trudeau defended the triviality his vacationing choice assigned to the day by saying that he had made phone calls, made more apologies, given indigenous people the holiday and cried with them. Being minutes away from Kamloops on his way to Tofino, he still chose to fly over them, rather than accept their invitations. He had already given them his best performance, tears and all.
Consider an earlier, unrehearsed situation involving indigenous Canadians. In front of a gaggle of wealthy Torontonians in March of 2019, Trudeau mocked indigenous women for daring to ask in protest about the mercury poisoning of water in their Grassy Narrows community. Shooting from the hip, his unscripted reply was: “Thank you for your donation tonight, I really appreciate it.” His sarcastic gratitude referred to the $1,500 per person the protestors paid to attend the posh fundraising gathering in the benefit of his Liberal Party. The footage shows the party faithful loudly cheering the prime minister’s wit as the security detail whisked away the women. Seconds later, a male voice cried out to Trudeau: “if it was your family waiting for 500 days, if your family was suffering from mercury poisoning, what would you do?” He too was spirited away, silenced, as the PM repeated his thank-you.
These two unrehearsed and seemingly minor situations stand in contrast to Trudeau’s scripted words and symbolic actions. They show a face (not a black one) of the Justin Trudeau that Judy Wilson-Raybould would easily recognize.
The prime minister may be using indigenous Canadians as human props to get their votes, and the votes of Canadians for whom better treatment of indigenous people is important. I ignore what lies in the PM’s heart. But for all the grand pronouncements, it is up to indigenous and other Canadians of good will to ask themselves whether indigenous Canadians are better off today than they were before 2015. It is up to them to put the prime minister to Plutarch’s test.
Marco Navarro-Genie is presidents of the Haultain Research Institute and a senior fellow with the Frontier Centre for Public Policy. He is co-author, with Barry Cooper, of COVID-19: The Politics of a Pandemic Moral Panic (2020).
Well, things could get much worse, and probably will. The current trends in political support indicate that Alberta will elect another NDP government in 2023. And this time it won’t be an accident.
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These are not good times for Alberta or the conservative movement in Canada. Justin Trudeau has been reelected with a commitment to phase out Alberta’s oil industry, and the Conservative Party of Canada is led by a liberal wannabe who can’t win for all the pandering in the world. On top of that, COVID is wreaking havoc on our freedoms and our health care system.
How much worse can it get?
Well, things could get much worse, and probably will. The current trends in political support indicate Alberta will elect another NDP government in 2023. And this time it won’t be an accident.
The first words of Creedence Clearwater Revival’s 1969 hit, Bad Moon Rising portend what is coming.

“I see the bad moon a-rising
I see trouble on the way
I see earthquakes and lightnin’
I see bad times today”
The main reason for the impending doom is the fact Premier Jason Kenney’s political future looks bleak, as does the future of the United Conservative Party itself. The NDP has been leading in the polls for a while. A few weeks ago Lorne Gunter wrote a column reporting polls showing the NDP at 39% to the UCP’s 29%t. A June Angus Reid poll had the Wildrose Independence Party at 20%.
Calgary Herald columnist Don Braid noted recently that with Kenney’s extremely low approval ratings in Edmonton and Calgary, “the NDP could win the province with little help from rural Alberta.” In rural Alberta, the Wildrose could make it a deadly pincer move on two fronts.
Of course, Kenney’s unpopularity and the UCP’s low standing in the polls aren’t the only indicators of the NDP’s apparently bright future. Braid also pointed out the “NDP has vastly outstripped the UCP in fundraising all this year.” In the last quarter, it was by an incredible two-to-one margin
Currently, it looks like Alberta is on a path to elect another NDP government with Rachel Notley as premier.
If you thought the last NDP government was bad, you ain’t seen nothing yet.
As Braid’s 2016 book (co-authored with Sydney Sharpe) Notley Nation: How Alberta’s Political Upheaval Swept the Country explains, the NDP caucus elected in 2015 was “comparatively young, both in experience and age, with just four returning MLAs and a high quota of members in their twenties and thirties.” Such inexperience may have slowed the implementation of the party’s agenda, at least in the early phase.
By contrast, an NDP government elected in 2023 would include a cadre of experienced and highly motivated MLAs, bent on rapidly accomplishing a radical policy agenda to transform the province. An NDP government elected in 2023 would have a clear mandate to go “full NDP” without the hesitancy caused by the perception they were an “accidental” government in 2015.
That agenda would likely be similar to the plan outlined in the NDP’s 2015 election platform, which was described by Braid and Sharpe as “nothing less than government engineering of a new economy, through a shift from non-renewable resources to green industries that either didn’t exist or were still in corporate infancy.” They hastened to add, “All this would require government action and intervention on a scale that most Albertans, through the long decades of conservative rule, never conceived possible.”
Besides radical economic policies, a second NDP government would undoubtedly complete the educational policy changes initiated during its first term. The curriculum developed under the current UCP government would be thrown out altogether, and a new curriculum, more in keeping with the hardline ‘progressive’ ideological bent of the government and its friends in the education establishment — notably the education faculties and the Alberta Teachers’ Association — would be adopted.
Most fearful of all for private education supporters, the NDP’s war on religious minority schools would undoubtedly recommence. The NDP’s demand that private schools remove Christian teachings about marriage and sexuality from their “Safe and Caring” policies — as indicated by the “rainbow reprimand” of 2018 — would be aggressively implemented. The “rainbow reprimand” demonstrated that Dippers enjoy nothing so much as shoving their morality down the throats of non-governmental education supporters.
In short, Albertans can expect a hard left turn from the next NDP government.
Of course, if the UCP is able to pull a rabbit out of the hat, perhaps things won’t turn out as bad as they currently appear. It’s hard to see how Jason Kenney could improve his popularity to the point of getting re-elected, but the unexpected has occurred before. If he were to resign on the other hand, perhaps his replacement could restore the good-standing of the UCP in the voters’ eyes. But that, too, would be a steep hill to climb. Furthermore, it doesn’t seem that the Wildrose Independence Party is making big enough inroads into Alberta’s two largest cities to make it a contender for power at this point. At present, it stands to make serious inroads outside the two big cities, but that’s all. Thus, the odds appear to favour another NDP government in 2023.
A bad moon is rising.
Michael Wagner is columnist for the Western Standard. He has a PhD in political science from the University of Alberta. His books include ‘Alberta: Separatism Then and Now’ and ‘True Right: Genuine Conservative Leaders of Western Canada.’
Fresh flesh, or live cells, are required to harvest cell lines used in many vaccines. There are currently 1,559 catalogued cell lines that required hundreds of sacrificed babies in the process of development.
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Warning: This column contains disturbing content. Reader discretion is advised.
So-called anti-vaxers are being vilified for allegedly putting the rest of society at risk by not complying with getting the jab.
Some simply object to losing freedom of choice when mandated to do so on pain of losing their basic freedoms.
For others, it’s not necessarily about being anti-vaccine. It’s about opposing abortion-tainted vaccines and other medicines. 
Conscientious objectors can’t stomach the brutality involved in obtaining fetal cells used in research and development for COVID-19 vaccines, organ transplants, or other medical issues.
All COVID-19 vaccines – and others – available to Canadians during some point of development relied on cell lines derived from aborted fetal tissue. Pfizer was just outed for trying to hide its use of cell lines from the public.
But even Pope Francis decreed that during a pandemic, the good of life-saving vaccines outweighs the fact that unborn children were aborted to create them.
Just as those who opt not to get vaccinated aren’t the bad guys, neither are those who do. Nobody wants to die.
The culprits are researchers who utilize barbaric, unethical methods to get at human tissue, and are sometimes caught lying about. 
Fresh flesh, or live cells, are required to harvest cell lines used in many vaccines. There are currently 1,559 catalogued cell lines that required hundreds of sacrificed unborn children in the process of development.
Biologist Pamela Acker, who authored Vaccination: A Catholic Perspective, described how some cell lines are obtained.
“These babies were literally placed in a fridge alive and then stored between one and 24 hours until they could be dismembered,” Acker told LifeSite News.
“The babies were — and in some cases, the uterus as well — removed from the woman, and without even puncturing the amniotic sac, placed directly into the refrigerator where it was kept for no more than 24 hours,” said Acker.
She parted ways with the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation over ethical concerns on using the HEK-293 cell line used in many COVID-19 vaccines.
In 2020, China’s Walvax Biotechnology Company announced its coronavirus vaccine, with distribution of 200 million doses annually scheduled to start mid-2021.
WALVAX2, the most recent aborted fetal cell line, came from the ninth baby in its development series. It was derived from lung tissue obtained from an aborted female at the end of its first trimester.
Walvax didn’t mention this vaccine came from a made-to-order baby that was cut up alive.
“With WALVX-2 they prescreened the mothers and fathers. They did all kinds of tests,” said Dr. Jose Trasancos, CEO of the Texas-based non-profit Children of God for Life, which is devoted to ending the use of aborted children in biomedical research and commerce.
Parents excluded were those in lines of work with environmental exposures, genetic anomalies, and family history of chronic diseases.
“They selected nine babies. They scheduled induced abortions. The child is born alive. It’s dissected as soon as it is born. What they are doing to live babies in China, they are doing here to some extent.”
Whether using aborted fetal cells for vaccines or other medical purposes “it’s basically a dipper of water out of the same bucket.” 
End results of these research projects inevitably make their way to Canada.
The University of Pennsylvania is under investigation for methods used in ex vivo liver profusion research for liver transplants.
“The lead researcher is Dr. Jorg Gerlech. He’s been working with livers from aborted fetuses. Lately, they haven’t been aborted at all. They’ve been born alive. They’ve had their livers dissolved while they are still living,” said Trasancos.
“That’s premeditated murder and the plundering of a body. That’s backed up by scientific literature. That’s not speculation. That’s not sensationalism. That’s what the man wrote down.”
Researchers at the University of Pittsburgh also came under fire in May for conducting experiments where scalps of five-month-old, aborted babies were stitched onto lab rats and mice. Why? To see how long the hair would grow on humanized mice for purposes of treating infections on human skin. 
This research was funded by multiple grants from Dr. Anthony Fauci’s National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID).
“The fact that they were using scalps from five-month-old, aborted babies, means that the heads of those children probably needed to be intact in order to get scalps, which is an indication that those were either partial-birth abortion or even infants delivered alive and whole,” said David Daleiden, director of the Centre for Medical Progress. 
Dr. Kyle McKenna, a researcher at Ohio’s Franciscan University of Steubenville, said the increasingly desensitized scientific community is pushing boundaries with the use of fetal tissue research. And no one is pushing back hard enough.
“All people of good conscience have a responsibility to voice opposition in order to promote development of alternatives, he said.
That’s what he’s doing in a study on COVID-19 herd immunity involving the development of an antibodies test not using materials produced in cell lines from aborted tissue.
TOMORROW: A closer look at alternatives.
Slobodian is the Senior Manitoba Columnist for the Western Standard
[email protected]
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