The state tech policy battles that will rage in 2022 – Axios

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Illustration: Megan Robinson/Axios
States will ramp up the momentum they've built in tackling key tech policy priorities through 2022, speeding ahead of any potential federal legislation.
Why it matters: As Congress continues to make little tangible progress passing new rules for the tech industry, state legislatures have taken the lead in enacting new tech regulations.
What to watch: These are the tech policy fights that will play out in the states next year, according to industry watchers.
1. Privacy: Industry groups have pressed Congress to enact a comprehensive privacy law to avoid a patchwork of state regulation, but states continue to move forward while federal lawmakers tread water.
2. App store regulations: Arizona advanced a bill that would let developers in the state avoid the typical 30% fees that Apple and Google charge developers, but it ultimately failed after intense industry lobbying.
3. Speech and content moderation: Lawmakers in Florida and Texas, raising complaints that conservatives had been censored, both passed laws aimed at limiting social media companies' content moderation practices — but those laws were blocked by the courts.
4. Digital taxes: Maryland in 2021 became the first state to pass a law taxing revenue that large tech companies generate from showing online ads to state residents.
5. Cybersecurity risks: Maryland and Minnesota considered bills in 2021 that would study cybersecurity risks, and New York considered a data breach notification bill. In total, 21 states considered cybersecurity-related legislation in 2021.
Meanwhile, tech trade groups are following the action, beefing up their lobbying operations in the states.
The bottom line: "There is not the internet of Texas. There is not the internet of Maine. There is the internet. And a lot of these issues should be dealt with at the federal level," Edmonson said.
Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios
Columbus Mayor Andrew Ginther and Reynoldsburg Mayor Joe Begeny are urging the U.S. Senate to enact major voting rights laws ahead of this year's midterm elections.
Why it matters: If passed, the new laws would significantly impact voting access in Ohio and across the country.
Illustration: Eniola Odetunde/Axios
Monday's Elizabeth Holmes verdicts became, instantly and inevitably, a Rorschach test for Silicon Valley's self-image.
What they're saying: Critics of tech's go-go startup culture saw the Theranos founder's conviction on four counts of conspiracy and fraud as evidence that the entire industry sits on a foundation of deception and hype. Others cited the outcome as healthy proof that even a business built on daring the impossible has a ceiling on hubris.
Gov. Kim Reynolds attends a pre-session press conference on Jan. 4, 2022. Photo: Linh Ta/Axios
Gov. Kim Reynolds and key Iowa lawmakers shared their legislative priorities during a news conference Tuesday — giving a preview of what to expect this session.
Below are some of the major issues this year and where state lawmakers stand:
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